Thursday, October 10, 2019

Think Turkey Everyday During Canadian Turkey Month

turkey bowl
October is Canadian Turkey Month and we are so excited to get Canadians thinking about turkey all month long! Think turkey every day, whether you're planning for weeknight dinners, weekend family nights, or gatherings with special friends. Remember that Canadian turkey can be the cornerstone of every meal. Think turkey and try swapping it for the usual protein in any of your favourite recipes and get ready to be surprised at how delicious and tasty it will be. There are so many ways to get cooking with turkey and Canadian Turkey Month is a great time to treat your family to some new and exciting turkey recipes!

canadian turkey
Consider reaching for turkey as part of your weekly grocery routine. Hectic days and packed schedules make it challenging to prepare healthy recipes, and by choosing turkey, you can feel good feeding your family meals packed with protein and nutrients. For breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks, make the switch to turkey as part of your everyday meal planning. With our tips and recipes, we can help you choose dishes that will make it fast and easy for you to feed your family every day.

Planning for Thanksgiving? Canadians are gearing up to celebrate one of their favourite holidays of the year! Making memories over a festive meal with family and friends is the greatest way to participate in this Canadian tradition. Whether you're a novice cook new to feeding a crowd or a seasoned pro in the kitchen, let Canadian Turkey help you create a show-stopping Thanksgiving celebration and provide you with the tips and tricks you need to make a delicious and memorable meal.

One of the best things about roasting a whole turkey is having delicious leftovers that you can use to make meals for a later date. When you think turkey, you can strategically plan to make leftovers from your main meal by buying a turkey that is a few pounds heavier than you need, or just add an extra half pound per person. While sitting down to your Thanksgiving feast, your family will never guess that this meal will be doing double duty by providing you with meal starter packs so you can have a head start on busy weeknights ahead.

Leftover turkey can be shredded, cubed or sliced, and stored in the freezer to be used as a handy base for a healthy meal. These portions of pure lean protein will be a busy mom's best friend in the kitchen, where they can be used to make soups, salads, pastas, casseroles, wraps, sandwiches and more. With a little planning, there are endless ways to use these power protein packs! You can use your leftovers in any of your favourite recipes, or visit canadianturkley.ca where you can find a selection of delicious recipes for inspiration. Turkey leftovers give you so many options for making new and tasty main meals and snacks for your family every day!

There are unlimited ways to incorporate turkey into your everyday meals. With so many good reasons to enjoy it, put turkey on the top of your weekly grocery list. We'll be celebrating all things turkey during Canadian Turkey Month, and we're inviting all Canadians to think turkey on their tables for breakfast, lunch and dinner. We know your family will love sampling some delectable turkey recipes and Canadian Turkey is here with all the tips that you need!

5 REASONS TO REACH FOR TURKEY DURING CANADIAN TURKEY MONTH

1. Easy Sub 
Turkey makes everyday meals delicious and tasty. It's packed with deep and satisfying flavour and you can easily substitute turkey into any of your family's favourite meals. Make Canadian Turkey Month the time to sample some new and different recipes.

2. Lean But Juicy 
It's hard to believe but with turkey, both white and dark cuts are lean. That means you can enjoy any cut you prefer, and feel good knowing you are choosing a healthy protein without compromising on flavour, tenderness or juiciness. To find out more about why turkey is a healthy choice for everyday living, visit https://www.canadianturkey.ca/nutrition/.

3. So Much To Choose From
Turkey is such a versatile protein, with so many cuts of both dark and white meat to choose from, including ground meat, legs, drumsticks, breast steaks, breast rolls, breast roasts, thighs, drummettes, wings, sausages, and burgers. With such a wide selection, you can enjoy turkey at breakfast, lunch or dinner, with leftovers that taste delicious the next day. Look for a variety of cuts at your local grocer or butcher during Canadian Turkey Month.

4. Pack A Flavour Punch
 Turkey plays well with other flavours. It's hearty taste and texture marry well with bold profiles, making it a perfect partner for spices and rubs. Make recipes your own by using your family’s favourite flavours and change up your everyday dishes using rubs, marinades and sauces. Need inspiration? Visit https://www.canadianturkey.ca/recipe-category/featured-recipes

5. Perfect For Penny Pinchers
Turkeys are generally larger than other poultry options and deliver a lot of meat for the price. Whole birds can be roasted for pennies per pound, and are a perfect choice for batch cooking meals or freezing leftover meat that can come in handy as an everyday meal starter. Cuts like drums, breasts and thighs are larger, so you need fewer pieces to feed your family and plan for leftovers to stock your fridge.

Looking for additional tips, recipes, Turkey Basics videos and HOW TOs? Visit canadianturkey.ca for all your cooking inspiration.  Canadian Turkey makes your Thanksgiving easy with all the recipe suggestions and turkey prep tips you need. The Year Round Whole Turkey HOW TOs section will help you prepare a whole Canadian turkey for your friends and family for any occasion. And the recipe section is filled with delicious recipes for whole turkey and turkey cuts so you can get tasty, nutritious and versatile turkey on your table every day!
turkey bowl
Turkey Buddha Bowls
Serves: 4-6
Prep time: 20 mins Cook time: 25 mins

Ingredients:
2 cups Canadian turkey leftovers
2 cups cubed sweet potato 
2 X 398 ml cans of chickpeas, drained 
1 tsp each: turmeric, ground cumin, garlic powder, onion powder
3 cups kale, roughly chopped 
1 cup shredded cabbage 
2 avocados, sliced 
2 tbsp olive oil 
1/2 cup slivered almonds
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 
Salt and pepper to taste

Dressing: 
¼ cup olive oil 
1/3 cup water 
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
2 tsp apple cider vinegar 
½ avocado 
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 
¼ cup fresh basil 
½ tbsp honey 
Salt and pepper to taste
         
Instructions: 
  1. Preheat oven to 400ºF (200ºC). 
  2. Spread chickpeas and sweet potatoes on a non-stick baking sheet.
  3. Drizzle with ½ of the olive oil. Season with dried spices and salt and pepper to taste. 
  4. Bake for 20 – 25 mins or until lightly browned. Let cool.
  5. While baking, heat the other ½ of the olive oil in a skillet.
  6. Sauté kale over high heat until lightly browned and wilted, 2-3 mins.
  7. To make dressing: combine all ingredients and blend with a mini food processor or hand blender until dressing is smooth and creamy.
  8. Assemble the salad. Divide kale evenly between the bowls.
  9. Pile the kale on each bowl and top with chickpeas, sweet potatoes, cabbage and avocado.
  10. Top each with a generous serving of turkey.
  11. Sprinkle with almonds and cilantro.
  12. Drizzle with dressing and serve.

TIP: You can make the dressing, kale, sweet potatoes and chickpeas up to 3 days ahead. With these ingredients on hand, this bowl will come together in less than 15 minutes on a busy weeknight for dinner or quick weekend lunch.

turkey bowl

Giveaway
If you are in Canada and would like to win a $75 Hudson's Bay e-gift card (redeemable at The Bay or thebay.com) enter to win using the giveaway tool before November 9th 2019. Please leave comments and follow the social media networks to be eligible to win. 
Update: The winner is Debbie

Disclosure: This post is sponsored by Canadian Turkey. Please note that all opinions and thoughts expressed are my own.All rights reserved on photographs and written content Createwithmom © 2010 - 2019. Please Ask First 

320 comments:

  1. Bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on hands, cutting boards, knives and counter tops. Frequent cleaning can keep that from happening. Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food

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  2. I learned that you should defrost your turkey overnight in the fridge - never on the counter.

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  3. I learned the how to's about brining a turkey before cooking!

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  4. It is best to defrost a turkey in the fridge.

    ReplyDelete
  5. When thawing a turkey in the refrigerator,allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Never thaw your turkey at room temperature! Either use one of two methods, refrigerator or cold water.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I learned that Bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F) To reduce food born illness chill your Turkey properly. I learned that it's best to defrost your Turkey in the fridge.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I learned that you should defrost your turkey in the fridge

    ReplyDelete
  9. I learnt - Use a food thermometer – you can’t tell if food is cooked safely by how it looks.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I f you are going to thaw the turkey with cold water, Allow 2 hours/kg of thawing time

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  11. I learned to thaw by keeping the turkey in its original wrapping.

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  12. I learned that you should never defrost your turkey on the counter - do it overnight in the fridge!

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  13. I learned about thawing a frozen turkey since this is something I need to know for this weekend! I learned that I’ll need to allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).

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  14. Roast the turkey in a preheated 350°F (177°C), basting as desired until the internal temperature reaches 170°F (77°C) in the thigh for an unstuffed turkey and 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey

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  15. Defrost in fridge not the sink

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  16. I learned that you can thaw a turkey in cold water and to allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound.

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  17. Place turkey breast-up on a rack in a shallow roasting pan.

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  18. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I learned that for a 8 – 10 lbs stuffed turkey, I need to roast it for 2 h 40 min – 3 h 30 min at at 350°F

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  21. I learned about "spatch-cocking". I guess the cooking time would be greatly reduced.

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  22. CARVING THE DRUMSTICK AND THIGH
    Remove the drumstick and thigh by pressing the leg away from the body of the bird. The joint connecting the leg to the backbone will often snap free, or may be severed easily with a knife point. Cut the dark meat completely from the body by following the body contour carefully with the knife.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I love the idea of Spatchcocking!
    jan

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  24. I learned that a turkey is done when a meat thermometer inserted into the thigh reads 180°F for a stuffed turkey or 170°F for an unstuffed turkey.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I learn how to Spatchcocking or Flattening a Whole Turkey! Perfect for when the turkey too big!

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  26. Use a food thermometer – you can’t tell if food is cooked safely by how it looks. thanks

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  27. I learned that there is no quality differences between fresh and frozen turkeys.
    Florence Cochrane

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  28. SLICING DARK MEAT
    Place the drumstick and thigh on a separate plate and cut through the connecting joint. Both pieces may be individually sliced. Tilt the drumstick to a convenient angle, slicing towards the plate.

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  29. I learned that when thawing a turkey in water, the water should be changed at least every hour. I never would have known to do that!

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  30. I learned about “SPATCHCOCKING” OR FLATTENING A WHOLE TURKEY

    ReplyDelete
  31. thawing a turkey in the refrigerator,allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I learned that brining makes the turkey plump, tastier and retains moisture in the meat.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Santiago happens when I'm called and my cousin doesn't substantially at everything.
    I've always loved living cannabis. For years she's been working
    regarding interviewer and she will not change it anytime
    in the near future. Fishing of your of the items
    he loves most. My wife and I keep a website. You might want to you'll
    find the site here: http://ingrandimento-del-pene.eu/Python-Gel.html

    ReplyDelete
  34. a frozen turkey is just as good as a fresh
    jan

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  35. Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

    ReplyDelete
  36. I learned it is best to defrost a turkey in the fridge.

    ReplyDelete
  37. I learned that Bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F)

    ReplyDelete
  38. I learned that,for deep frying, it is best to buy a turkey weighing less than 15 pounds.

    ReplyDelete
  39. When buying your turkey calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person. If you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person.

    ReplyDelete
  40. SLICING DARK MEAT
    Place the drumstick and thigh on a separate plate and cut through the connecting joint. Both pieces may be individually sliced. Tilt the drumstick to a convenient angle, slicing towards the plate.

    ReplyDelete
  41. I learned that the safest way to thaw a turkey is in the fridge.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Even for experienced cooks, the improper heating and preparation of food means bacteria can survive. Use a food thermometer – you can’t tell if food is cooked safely by how it looks

    ReplyDelete
  43. After deep frying a turkey, you should let the turkey stand for at least 20 minutes to allow it to finish cooking and also to allow the juices to set.

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  44. I like the tip on deep frying a turkey. Make sure it is completely thawed before putting in the hot fat.

    Florence Cochrane

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  45. I did learn that you can thaw a turkey in cold water.

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  46. I learned how to slice a whole turkey.

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  47. The fridge is the best place to thaw your turkey.

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  48. hawing a turkey in the refrigerator,allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound.

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  49. If stuffing the turkey, do so while the oven is preheating. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking. (Allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.)

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  50. Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.
    Florenc Cochrane

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  51. Canada Utility turkeys are birds with minor skin tears or one or more parts missing which in no way affects the quality. Use these turkeys for cutting up or when carving before serving.

    “There is no quality or taste difference between a Canada Grade A turkey or Utility grade turkey”.

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  52. Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for one year.

    ReplyDelete
  53. It’s best to defrost the turkey in the fridge

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  54. best to thawing a turkey in the refrigerator,allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound.

    ReplyDelete
  55. If you are defrosting your turkey using the cold water method allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound (2 hours/kg).

    ReplyDelete
  56. When thawing a turkey in the refrigerator, allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound & whole turkeys can be kept frozen for one year.

    ReplyDelete
  57. I learned about how to cook a FLATTENING A WHOLE TURKEY.

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  58. Roast uncovered, or loosely covered with foil. If you choose to baste your turkey, limit the number of times you open and close your oven (once per hour is sufficient).

    ReplyDelete
  59. I learned There is no quality or taste difference between a Canada Grade A turkey or Utility grade turkey.

    ReplyDelete
  60. if thawing the turkey with cold water, Allow 2 hours/kg of thawing time

    ReplyDelete
  61. I learned that turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey.

    ReplyDelete
  62. Cassandra RobertsonOctober 14, 2019 at 5:26 PM

    I learned that you should defrost your turkey in the fridge.

    ReplyDelete
  63. Place turkey breast-up on a rack in a shallow roasting pan.

    ReplyDelete
  64. I learned that it is best to defrost a turkey in the refrigerator.

    ReplyDelete
  65. I learned never leave the turkey out longer then 2hrs at room temperature

    ReplyDelete
  66. Cross-contamination is how harmful bacteria spread. Keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood and their juices away from foods that won’t be cooked.

    ReplyDelete
  67. The safest way to thaw a whole frozen turkey is either in the refrigerator or in cold water. Not on the counter!

    ReplyDelete
  68. I learned that you should defrost your turkey in the fridge

    ReplyDelete
  69. The four easy lessons of Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill can help prevent harmful bacteria from making your family sick. 

    ReplyDelete
  70. I learned to never thaw a turkey at room temperature!

    ReplyDelete
  71. if thawing a turkey in the refrigerator,allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound

    ReplyDelete
  72. I learned about brining a turkey before cooking!

    ReplyDelete
  73. Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

    ReplyDelete
  74. For best results, choose a turkey weighing less than 15 pounds (less than 6.8 kg) if you are deep frying it.

    ReplyDelete
  75. You can easily use your barbeque to prepare a grilled turkey that’s moist, tender, delicious and nutritious. Prepare turkey as you would if you were roasting it in your oven:

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  76. Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food.

    ReplyDelete
  77. When stuffing a turkey do it while the oven is preheating and spoon the stuffing in lightly.
    Florence Cochrane

    ReplyDelete
  78. I learned that Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

    ReplyDelete
  79. Bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F)

    ReplyDelete
  80. Canada Utility turkeys are birds with minor skin tears or one or more parts missing which in no way affects the quality. Use these turkeys for cutting up or when carving before serving.

    ReplyDelete
  81. Be sure to chill food properly to reduce risk of foodborne illnesses

    ReplyDelete
  82. Remove the turkey from the oven when cooking is completed and let stand 20 minutes to allow the juices to set.

    ReplyDelete
  83. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear.

    ReplyDelete
  84. When deep frying a turkey, be sure that the turkey is totally thawed before immersing it in the oil.

    ReplyDelete
  85. I learned about thawing a frozen turkey I learned that I’ll need to allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).

    ReplyDelete
  86. I learned that there is no difference between the quality of the meat of grade A or a utility turkey

    ReplyDelete
  87. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey

    ReplyDelete
  88. The safest way to thaw a turkey is in the fridge or in cold water

    ReplyDelete
  89. Once thawed, treat a previously frozen turkey as you would a fresh turkey and do not refreeze until cooke

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  90. if the meat thermometer reads 170 your turkey is done

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  91. When roasting, any stuffing placed in the cavity of the bird should read and internal temperature of at least 165°F (74°C).

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    Replies
    1. Make sure to fully cook the turkey before refreezing

      Delete
  92. Brining adds flavour and moisture to your turkey meat.

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  93. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C)

    ReplyDelete
  94. I learned that brining makes for a moister turkey.

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  95. I learned that you should defrost your turkey in the fridge

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  96. Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

    ReplyDelete
  97. I learned that turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey.

    ReplyDelete
  98. CARVING THE DRUMSTICK AND THIGH
    Remove the drumstick and thigh by pressing the leg away from the body of the bird. The joint connecting the leg to the backbone will often snap free, or may be severed easily with a knife point. Cut the dark meat completely from the body by following the body contour carefully with the knife.

    ReplyDelete
  99. I learned that it is best to spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking.

    ReplyDelete
  100. Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

    ReplyDelete
  101. Washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary and may promote cross-contamination to other foods. If you choose to rinse raw poultry, be sure to wash sink and tap areas well with hot soapy water and disinfect with a bleach solution.

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  102. Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

    ReplyDelete
  103. Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food. Wash all surfaces after preparing your turkey to prevent cross contamination from it.

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  104. PREPARING THE BREAST
    Place the knife parallel and as close to the wing as possible. Make a deep cut into the breast, cutting right to the bone. This is your base cut. All breast slices stop at this horizontal cut.

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  105. Defrost turkey in the fridge is the safest way

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  106. Lightly brush with oil or melted margarine and sprinkle outside and cavity with seasonings.

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  107. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey. :) important to know!!

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  108. I learned to defrost a turkey in its wrapper in cold water.

    ReplyDelete
  109. Use a food thermometer – you can’t tell if food is cooked safely by how it looks.

    ReplyDelete
  110. I learned that you should defrost your turkey in the fridge

    ReplyDelete
  111. I learned that Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year!

    ReplyDelete
  112. I learned that you should thaw a frozen turkey in the refrigerator or in cold water

    ReplyDelete
  113. Some turkey products are meant to be cooked from frozen so you must always read your product label carefully.

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  114. Once the turkey is thawed, keep your turkey refrigerated and cook within 48 hours.

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  115. I learned when deep frying a Whole Turkey choose a turkey weighing less than 15 pounds (less than 6.8 kg).

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  116. I learned that after roasting you should let stand 20 minutes to allow the juices to set.

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  117. Deep Frying a Whole Turkey - use one 15lbs or less.

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  118. Washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary and may promote cross-contamination to other foods.

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  119. Preheat oven to 350°F (177°C).

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  120. Put leftovers in fridge, never leave out more then 2 hours

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  121. I learned that you should never thaw your turkey at room temperature; rather in the fridge or cold water!

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  122. I learned that if you are deep frying a turkey, to ensure it is completely thawed, dried thoroughly inside and out, & to never stuff it.

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  123. The optimal temperature for deep-frying is 375°F (190.5°C); if the temperature is not hot enough, the turkey will absorb more oil and may taste greasy.

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  124. I learned to defrost my turkey in original wrapper.

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  125. always remove the stuffing out of a cooked turkey

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  126. I learned to baste the Turkey every 15 – 20 minutes when barbecuing.

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  127. The brining process requires a 6-24 hour soaking period,

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  128. If barbequing, you want to make sure that you have something separating your bird from the flame, such as a pizza stone.

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  129. I learned all about the brining process and that it can add a lot of flavour to turkey.

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  130. I learned it takes a bit of effort to cook a turkey on the grill but I think the added flavour would make that effort worth it. "Place pan on barbeque grill preheated to medium and close lid. After 20 – 30 minutes, lower heat to medium-low and tent turkey with foil to prevent over-browning. Baste every 15 – 20 minutes. For barbeques with temperature settings, keep barbeque adjusted to 350°F – 375°F (177° C – 190°C)."

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  131. If you choose to baste your turkey, limit the number of times you open and close your oven (once per hour is sufficient).

    ReplyDelete
  132. Cross-contamination is how harmful bacteria spread. Keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood and their juices away from foods that won’t be cooked.

    ReplyDelete
  133. The refrigerator method of thawing a turkey is the safest, as it keeps the meat cold until it is completely defrosted.

    ReplyDelete
  134. its safer to defrost a turkey in the fridge.

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  135. I learned about Spatchcocking and that it allows the turkey to cook faster.

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  136. the addition of the salt in the brining procedure will yield a salty flavour to the turkey so it is wise to omit salt as an ingredient in the turkey stock

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  137. Calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person. Or if you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person.

    ReplyDelete
  138. It is best to defrost a turkey in the fridge.

    ReplyDelete
  139. When you thaw your turkey with the cold water method you should change the water at least every hour.

    ReplyDelete
  140. Never thaw your turkey at room temperature!

    ReplyDelete
  141. Calculate 1 lb of turkey (450 g) per person. Or if you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person.

    ReplyDelete
  142. I learned that you should use a food thermometer to ensure the Turkey is fully cooked.

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  143. Deep Frying a Whole Turkey - use one 15lbs or less.

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  144. I learned that you should allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound!
    -Stephanie

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  145. Health Canada recommends using a fresh whole turkey stored in the refrigerator within 2-3 days of purchase.

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  146. Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg)when thawing a turkey in the refrigerator.

    ReplyDelete
  147. Before deep frying a turkey you have to make sure the turkey is dried with a paper towel so water does not get in the oil and make it boil over.

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  148. Never thaw your turkey at room temperature!

    ReplyDelete
  149. Even for experienced cooks, the improper heating and preparation of food means bacteria can survive. Use a food thermometer – you can’t tell if food is cooked safely by how it looks.

    ReplyDelete
  150. If thawing a turkey in the refrigerator Health Canada recommends that your refrigerator is set at 4 °C (40 °F)

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  151. turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C)

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  152. If no best-before date is present, Health Canada recommends using a fresh whole turkey stored in the refrigerator within 2-3 days of purchase or ask at the place of purchase.

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  153. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

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  154. I learned that a A 10 lb turkey takes approximately 35 minutes to cook when deep frying.

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  155. Never thaw your turkey at room temperature!

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  156. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear. Insert meat thermometer in the thickest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone.

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  157. When thawing a turkey in cold water keep the turkey in its original wrapping.

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  158. I learned I should roast my turkey in a preheated 350°F oven.

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  159. thaw a frozen turkey in the refrigerator or in cold water

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  160. I learnt that Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear.

    ReplyDelete
  161. All turkeys processed in a federally inspected plant bear a “Canada Approved” or “Canada” health inspection stamp.

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  162. A good tip I saw is "Food handling safety risks at home are more common than most people think. The four easy lessons of Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill can help prevent harmful bacteria from making your family sick."

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  163. After cooking, keep turkey hot (above 140°F (60°C)) or refrigerate (below 40°F (4°C)). DO NOT LEAVE TURKEY AT ROOM TEMPERATURE FOR MORE THAN 2 HOURS

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  164. When thawing a turkey in cold water change the water at least every hour.

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  165. I learned that a great tip when buying a turkey is to calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person Or if you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person.

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  166. i learned that you can keep a frozen whole turkey for up to 1 year.
    CL Chin

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  167. always best to defrost a turkey in the fridge.

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  168. DO NOT LEAVE TURKEY AT ROOM TEMPERATURE FOR MORE THAN 2 HOURS!!!

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  169. I learned to never thaw your turkey at room temperature.

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  170. When carving a turkey breast carve downward, ending at the base cut. Start each new slice slightly higher up on the breast. Keep slices thin and even.

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  171. I learned how to store cooked turkey. I did not know it can last for up to 3 months if stored correctly.

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  172. Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).

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  173. I learned to never leave out leftovers more than 2 hours.

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  174. internal temp 170 to ensure bird is safe when cooked

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  175. For deep-frying a turkey choose a turkey weighing less than 15 pounds (less than 6.8 kg).

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  176. DEEP FRYING SHOULD ONLY BE DONE OUTDOORS AND NEVER ON WOODEN DECKS OR INSIDE A GARAGE.

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  177. I learned that you should defrost turkey in fridge to be safe.

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  178. When thawing a turkey in cold water allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound (2 hours/kg).

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  179. allow at least 5 hours of thawing time per pound

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  180. I learned that All turkeys processed in a federally inspected plant bear a “Canada Approved” or “Canada” health inspection stamp. This stamp tells you that the product is safe to eat.

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  181. There is no quality or taste difference between a Canada Grade A turkey or Utility grade turkey. So you can save money with a utility turkey without sacrificing taste.

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  182. I also learned new ways to defrost/thaw turkey.

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  183. There is no quality or taste difference between a Canada Grade A turkey or Utility grade turkey

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  184. If stuffing the turkey, do so while the oven is preheating. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking. (Allow ½ cup (125 ml) of stuffing per pound (500 g) of turkey.)

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  185. thaw turkey 5 hours per pound

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  186. I learned to thaw a turkey in the fridge.

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  187. Spoon stuffing lightly into turkey instead of packing firmly because stuffing expands while cooking.

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  188. When thawing a whole turkey in water, change the water every hour.

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  189. best to Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).

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  190. Once thawed, keep your turkey refrigerated and cook within 48 hours.

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  191. When barbecuing your turkey you need to use a thermometer since cooking times vary depending on the BBQ. Insert the meat thermometer in the deepest part of the inner thigh, but not touching the bone. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey

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  192. Carve the turkey breast downward, ending at the base cut. Start each new slice slightly higher up on the breast. Keep slices thin and even.

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  193. Always use a food thermometer you can't tell if the turkey is cooked by look alone, it needs to be 180 degrees for stuffed and 170 for unstuffed

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  194. best-before dates on product packaging should be consulted to determine how long a fresh whole turkey can be safely stored in the refrigerator.

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  195. I learned to never leave leftovers out for more than 2 hours.

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  196. The brining process requires a 6-24 hour soaking period, and ideally should be done the day before roasting.

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